Action

LNG Rally. | Photo by Allen Hallmark

On this page you will find calls to action, such as requests that you write a letter, make a call, or send an e-mail; attend a hearing or a rally; submit comments on a land use decision or policy matter; or get involved in helping to organize a campaign.  Some significant new opportunities are listed below, along with some ongoing ways to get involved. 

 

Rise Above Plastics Day at Capitol 

Rise Above Plastics Day at the Oregon State Capitol is Thursday March 14 - 10am-5pm

~Learn about the global plastic pollution problem

~Celebrate Oregonians' efforts to Rise Above Plastics

~Take the Rise Above Plastics Pledge to reduce single-use plastics

~Meet your legislators and ask them to Pledge to Rise Above Plastics

Join us for a day of education and action!

10am - 2pm | Students tour Plastics Education Stations, meet legislators

2pm - 5pm | Open tours of Plastics Education Stations, meet legislators

Volunteers Needed!

If you would like to meet with your legislators and/or volunteer at Rise Above Plastics Day, please sign up here.

School field trip opportunities: please email rap@oregon.surfrider.org for more information.

Rise Above Plastics Day is co-hosted by Surfrider Foundation Oregon, the Oregon Coast Aquarium, SOLVE, Oregon Shores / Coast Watch, and Environment Oregon, with funding from the NOAA Marine Debris Program.

Anti-LNG Lobby Day at Capitol

 Earlier anti-LNG rally at the Capitol\Photo courtesy of Rogue Climate.
Earlier anti-LNG rally at the Capitol\Photo courtesy of Rogue Climate.

The coalition of groups, including Oregon Shores, that opposes development of an LNG (liquefied natural gas) terminal on Coos Bay’s North Spit, has called for lobby day against LNG at the Oregon State Capitol on March 28.  Everyone who opposes the Jordan Cove Energy Project, which will not only do grave damage to the Coos Bay estuary and hundreds of streams and waterways, but also become the state’s largest source of the greenhouse gases contributing to climate change, is invited to come and declare their views to the legislature.

Meet in Hearing Room 50 at the Oregon State Capitol (900 Court St. N.E.) at 10 a.m.  A light breakfast will be offered, followed by training in lobbying.  After a lunch at noon, participants will meet in groups with their legislators (in sessions organized by the coalition).  The event will wind up with a group photo at 4:30 p.m.

Your RSVP is needed to help plan for the event.  Go here: https://bit.ly/2Gm6oi5.

For more information, contact Allie Rosenbluth, community organizer for Rogue Climate, at 703-298-3639, allie@rogueclimate.org.

Demand Protection for Nehalem Scenic Waterway

Nehalem Scenic Waterway. | Photo courtesy of LNCT

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission is considering Scenic Waterway status for the Nehalem River.  The decision will be made at their next meeting, Feb. 21 in Independence.  See listing in the calendar for details.

Meanwhile, the Oregon Department of Forestry has proposed widespread clearcutting of Oregon’s Tillamook and Clatsop State Forests in 2019, including large clearcuts in the proposed Nehalem River Scenic Waterway. The department also aims to open approximately 750 net acres of older forest to clearcutting, as well as to aerial spray thousands of acres.  

Eleven conservation and fishing groups asked the State Forester to further review and delay some of the most troublesome aspects of the Annual Operations Plans, which outline the management and timber harvests of state lands.

The comments submitted by the 11 groups asked for the Department of Forestry to delay the Woody Woodpecker Sale that would clearcut part of the proposed Nehalem State Scenic Waterway and to perform a biological review of the proposal to open 750 more acres of older forest to clearcutting.

Governor Kate Brown could help to protect the Nehalem and ensure the scenic, wildlife, and recreation values are protected through science-based management of our state-owned forests.

If you wish to urge Gov. Brown to protect the proposed Nehalem State Scenic Waterway and to support the conservation community recommendations to the State Forester, go here for her contact information.

Stop LNG Pipelines

 LNG pipeline under construction.
LNG pipeline under construction.

Oregon Shores is active in attempting to block development of the Pacific Connector pipeline that would cross southern Oregon to feed the proposed Jordan Cove LNG export facility that would be built on Coos Bay's North Spit, which we also oppose.

Pipelines are an environmental problem nationally, and there is a national movement against them.  To learn more about this, and find out how to sign petitions and take other actions against pipelines carrying oil and gas, see the website: http://www.stopthepipelines.org/

A useful source of information about how to get involved is a series of webinars on anti-pipeline and anti-fracking activism offered by Halt the Harm: https://halttheharm.net/services/webinar-series/#past-webinars

Adopt a Mile of the Coast

Nye Beach in Oregon at sunset.
Nye Beach in Oregon at sunset. | Photo by Linda Cochran

One way to take action now, for those who are not already CoastWatchers, is to adopt a CoastWatch mile.  One of our goals for CoastWatch's 25th anniversary year, 2018, is to finally attain coverage of every mile of the Oregon coast through CoastWatch.  You can help us reach this goal by adopting a mile that is not receiving regular coverage. 

Participate in Citizen Science Research

Volunteers at work on a COASST survey.  Photo by Melissa Keyser.
Volunteers at work on a COASST survey. | Photo by Melissa Keyser

Another form of action is to participate in one of our citizen science surveys, such as those for marine debris, beached birds, sea stars, stranded marine mammals, and others.  For more information check out the CoastWatch section and this article on citizen science opportunities.

Ditch Single-Use Plastic Straws

Ditch The Straw. | Photo by Chanel Hason

Plastic straws are among the most common items found at Portland Chapter Surfrider cleanups – both on the Oregon coast and in Portland! They are not biodegradable, which means that every plastic straw created is still around in some form. Plastic has a huge impact on our ecosystems, wildlife and people, and it is the chapter’s goal to reduce the amount of plastic that ends up in the environment.

In August 2017, the Portland Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation launched the DitchTheStrawPDX program in the Portland-Metro area. The mission of the program is to assist businesses in reducing the number of plastic straws used by their customers. The chapter provides support to these businesses who agree to go straw free for an entire month as a pilot program demonstrating that paper straws are a sustainable, cost-effective alternative.

Surfrider Portland's Ask: Join their movement to reduce plastic straw pollution by piloting a straw-on-request program for one month. Eliminate plastic straws by only providing paper straws upon request.

Are You a Business Interested in Participating? 

Click Here & Help Be Part of the Solution

Are you an individual that wants to participate?

Next time you’re out, simply ask for no straw, post a photo and tag (@SurfriderPortland) and #DitchTheStrawPDX on social media! They need your help to spread the word and the message.

Interested in supporting this program as a volunteer? Contact ditchthestraw@portland.surfrider.org